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Coal Communications Kit - Pollution in China
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Pollution in China

China does have a pollution problem, and the world is urging them to address it. China is a major contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, and with coal representing about 70 percent of their energy production (Institute for Energy Research, 2015), the use of coal is getting a very close look. In November of 2014, China and the U.S. announced an agreement in which Chinese President Xi Jinping promised his country’s CO2 emissions would peak around 2030 (Bloomberg News, 2015).

However, unlike the U.S., China continues to build new coal power plants. “China added 39 gigawatts of coal-fueled capacity in 2014. That is equivalent to three 1,000 megawatt units every four weeks. In addition, China is expected to add the equivalent of a new 600-megawatt plant every 10 days for the next 10 years (Institute for Energy Research, 2015).” China’s coal generation capacity is currently twice that of the United States, but is projected to be four times as much by 2040 (Institute for Energy Research, 2015). China is achieving this by using “ultra-supercritical” technology in its new coal plants, while shutting down smaller less efficient plants. Ultra-supercritical technology runs coal boilers at temperatures above 1,100 oF and at super critical pressures to ensure optimal steam cycle efficiency. This means less coal is needed to create the same amount of energy as a typical pulverized coal boiler.

In addition, ultra-supercritical plants have lower emissions, less solid waste to dispose of, reduced water use, and lower operating costs (American Electric Power, 2011). According to Sophie Lu, a Beijing-based analyst from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the ultra-supercritical coal plants will produce about 90 percent fewer pollutants, such as dust and sulfur dioxide (SO2) per kilowatt-hour of electricity generated (Bloomberg News, 2015).

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Ultra-supercritical coal plants will produce 90% fewer pollutants, produce less solid waste, reduce water use, and have lower operating costs (American Electric Power, 2011). #Coalcares #Thefutureishere

In the face of mounting pressure concerning pollution and global warming, China is not turning its back on coal. In fact, they are investing in coal technology to find ways to continue to use the cheap, abundant resource, but in a more environmentally friendly way. Coal is projected to remain the dominant fuel source in China for decades to come, with the help of continuing improvements in coal technology (Institute for Energy Research, 2015).

Pollution in China: Facebook Post

Ultra-supercritical plants have lower emissions, less solid waste to dispose of, reduced water use, and lower operating costs than traditional coal plants (American Electric Power, 2011). China has added 39 GWs of coal-fueled generation in 2014 alone, the equivalent of three 1,000 megawatt units every four weeks, much of it using these advanced technologies (Institute for Energy Research, 2015). Newer, clean coal technologies such as the ultra-supercritical coal plants allow for a cleaner atmosphere, while also securing energy reliability.

Pollution in China: Elevator Speech

China is addressing its pollution issues responsibly by retiring older, less efficient coal boilers, and replacing them with new coal boilers! China has added 39 GWs of coal fired generation in 2014 alone, the equivalent of three 1,000 megawatt units every four weeks. In addition, China is projected to add the equivalent of a new 600-megawatt power plant every 10 days for the next 10 years (Institute for Energy Research, 2015). Clean coal technology has made serious advancements in the past 20 years. One of these technological advancements is ultra-supercritical boilers, which have lower emissions, less solid waste to dispose of, reduced water use, and lower operating costs than traditional coal plants (American Electric Power, 2011). In addition, ultra-supercritical boilers still provide the reliability that fossil fuels are known for in an energy portfolio. China is refusing to give up their source of reliable generation, while also working to meet their emission goals. With newer, cleaner, coal technologies such as the ultra-supercritical coal plants, and reasonable regulations, a similar generation portfolio could be established in the United States, one that allows for a cleaner atmosphere, while also securing energy reliability.



 

 

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